Reviews

Poetry pamphlet review: Girl by Ella D. Gajic

Rating: ★★★★

I’ve mentioned before that all my flatmates are incredibly talented, and today I am presenting a poetry pamphlet by one of them: Ella D. Gajic. Girl deals with lots of different themes, all of them explored from a feminist point of view.

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I would like to start off my review by saying what an incredibly talented and busy person Ella is all-around. Having her as a flatmate has proven this on a daily basis, for she wakes up and immediately heads off to some kind of event, then has an audition for a play, then organises a whole poetry show, then reads spoken word at a bar, and still manages to go out with her friends at night and get up happy in the morning. I have no idea where she gets the energy, but it’s truly impressive. I would also like to say that she has no idea I’m writing this review, or that I even have a blog (and I would like it to stay that way), so this is in no way biased, and all of the things I’m gonna say about her writing are my own opinions.

Her poetry pamphlet includes 12 poems, and most of them are written with the intention to be performed. Spoken word is her favourite type of poetry, and she is amazing at reading her pieces out loud. This might be due to the fact that she also does some acting and loves performing in general, so it just kind of seems natural and easy when she does it.

Most of the poems deal with women’s issues in particular. For example, the poem “10” talks about the phrase “you’re definitely a 10” being meant as a compliment but actually coming off as rude, “Bride” deals with husbands undermining women and making them into perfect, quiet wives, “Mirror Mirror” is about beauty expectations and standards, and “Girl” deals with, well, what it means to be a girl. However, there are poems that tackle very different subjects as well. “Laced Clouds”, one of my personal favourites, criticises the way the Western world just stands by and watches, or even helps, as countries are destroyed by bombs and pointless violence. And my favourite piece of the pamphlet, “Genesis”, is about trying to forget someone you loved and painted as perfect but who turned out to not be worthy of you – it’s an incredible poem, and the writing in it is amazingly beautiful.

The pamphlet is self-published, so I am not sure where and how to get a copy. Ella usually sells them at the events she reads at, and I was lucky enough to get a free one (flatmate privilege!). If you’re really interested, you can check out her Facebook page, where she shares lots of stuff related to her upcoming events, and her poetry blog, where she (obviously) shares her writing.

 

I hope you guys will check out Ella’s poetry, she really is amazing at it! And if you know of any other great self-published authors (no self-advertising please), feel free to leave a comment with recommendations.

‘Till next time and happy reading!

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15 thoughts on “Poetry pamphlet review: Girl by Ella D. Gajic

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